poor shadows of elysium

All this happened, more or less. The war parts, anyway, are pretty much true.
~ Saturday, April 19 ~
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byrdhausen:

Alphonse Mucha ”Medee, Theatre de la Renaissance, Sarah Bernhardt” 


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~ Thursday, April 17 ~
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Henry V - son of Henry IV Parts 1 and 2 - was born to be a hero.

(Source: paulmcgann)


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wingthingaling:

The Most Beautiful Abandoned Railway Station in the World

This is an abandoned railway station in Abkhazia, former Russian territory. It stays untouched since the collapse of USSR – the railway connection of Abkhazia and Russia stopped and railway station left out of demand so nature could take over the left-overs of Soviet architecture.

Found on English Russia, photos by Ilya Varmalov

via MessyNessyChic


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~ Thursday, April 10 ~
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fireandheavenproductions27:

Matsuzaka Tori for Henry IV 『ヘンリー四世』

Finally photos from the stage , He looks amazing ;)!


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~ Tuesday, March 18 ~
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Knight, Death and the Devil by Albrecht Dürer. In The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche compared Schopenhauer to Dürer’s knight. 

Knight, Death and the Devil by Albrecht Dürer. In The Birth of Tragedy, Nietzsche compared Schopenhauer to Dürer’s knight. 


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~ Thursday, March 6 ~
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femme-de-lettres:

Wikimedia (Large)

Who knew that what the world really needed was a nightmarish empty-eyed Anglo-Saxon/Medieval blend production of Hamlet?

Edwin Austin Abbey did, apparently.

Or so The Play Scene in Hamlet, which he painted in 1897, evinces.

It combines a number of Abbey’s interests, as he (the Encyclopædia Britannica writes) “specialized in large literary and historical works encompassing the various period revivals then in fashion: [including] medieval, [and] Shakespearean….”

Its subjects maintain more humanity than do those in Daniel Maclise’s more traditional take, and their reactions speak more tellingly.

But that isn’t the only difference in Abbey’s scene.

We, dear reader, seem to be the play.

Claudius stares us down (evenly, stoically—but certainly tensely). Gertrude shrinks away from him as much as from the players. Polonius stares proudly in…entirely the wrong direction? Well, never mind him.

Ophelia seems a little glazed. But I’d be distracted by Hamlet’s carryings-on, too. Sitting on a heap of wolf furs, he seems less interested now in the lap he so insisted upon claiming than his uncle—a gaze shared by Horatio, who stands guard-like at the side with one hand on the hilt of his sword, to see how Claudius responds to this enactment of his guilt.

Meanwhile, one of the gravediggers has crashed the party, crouching beside the usurping king.

Everyone else peers out at us with flat affects and black eyes.

Including, disconcertingly, a child with a hunting horn.


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fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'A child's book of warriors' by William Canton; illustrated by Herbert Cole. Published 1907 by J.M. Dent & Sons, London.

See the complete book here.


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~ Friday, February 7 ~
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everythingscenic:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

1. Lee Savage

2. Christopher Oram

3. Neil Patel

4. Cameron Anderson


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~ Thursday, February 6 ~
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theparisreview:

“Should you deploy ‘whoreson cullionly barber-monger’ at your next bar brawl, you’ll emerge victorious, guaranteed.”
The best insults from Shakespeare’s King Lear.

theparisreview:

“Should you deploy ‘whoreson cullionly barber-monger’ at your next bar brawl, you’ll emerge victorious, guaranteed.”

The best insults from Shakespeare’s King Lear.


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funeral-wreaths:

A page from the Winchester Manuscript of Thomas Malory’s Morte d’Arthur, c. 1470-83

funeral-wreaths:

A page from the Winchester Manuscript of Thomas Malory’s Morte d’Arthur, c. 1470-83


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~ Monday, February 3 ~
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erikkwakkel:

The book that emerged from a bog after 1200 years

This is the remarkable story of a medieval book that spent 1200 years in the mud. Around 800 someone had a Book of Psalms made, a portable copy fitted with a leather satchel. The book consisted of sixty sheets of parchment that were carefully filled with handwritten words. Somehow the book ended up in a remote bog at Faddan More in north Tipperary, close to the town of Birr, Ireland. Dropped, perhaps, by the owner? Was he walking and reading at the same time? Did he himself also end up in the bog?

Fast-forward to 2006. Eddie Fogarty, the operator of a turf digger, noticed an object with faint lettering in the bucket of his machine (pic 1). There it was again, our Book of Psalms! At this point it resembled something from an Aliens movie (pic 2), but that changed quickly after it went to the restoration lab. Thanks to the conservation properties of turf, many pages were still intact, as was its leather satchel (pic 3), the only surviving specimen from this early period. Remarkably, among the damaged pages were some that had let go of the words: kept together merely by ink, the words were floating around by themselves - like some sort of medieval Scrabble (pic 4). It’s the most remarkable bookish survival story I know.

More on this phenomenal find in this news article and this one. Here is the bog and the machine that dug up the book More on the restoration process here. More about the papyrus found in the binding here. This is a nice movie on the book.


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~ Saturday, February 1 ~
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globefan:

promo pics from Knight of the Burning Pestle of Pauline Mclynn and Phil Daniels


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(Source: wheresmycow)


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